How can I select the best app of 2013 for my event?

Everybody is talking about them. Everybody wants one. But many people struggle with how to choose the right one. We are talking about mobile event apps: an unstoppable hype of the event industry. On 16 May, the Event Manager Blog launched The Event App Bible: an impressive attempt to bring some clarity into the general confusion concerning event apps. The free eBook offers a great overview of the many possibilities out there, however without making an explicit recommendation for the best event app. We like to help you with that selection: we analysed all apps listed in The Event App Bible and chose our personal favourite.

06 How to select Best Event app 2013 How can I select the best app of 2013 for my event? by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)What should a good event app be?

In order to be of value to your event or conference, an event app should ‘mean’ the following to you:

  • The app should make our event experience more intensive by providing functions that cannot be replaced by non-tech solutions. That means the app should provide functionalities that simplify a user’s ‘event-experiencing-process’.

  • The app should create additional value by extending the lifetime of the event beyond the boundaries of the physical event. It should stimulate (potential) attendees to engage before and after the event.

  • The perfect event appp should benefit everyone involved: participants, sponsors and the event organizer.

What 7 features should my event app have?

Page 23 of the Event App Bible lists a myriad features and functions of event apps. Unfortunately most of them are not necessary or even useless for your event. What should a good event app in our opinion at least be able to do?

1. Easy to sign up and manage Registrations

This is the first step at any event or conference and, if badly organized, it can be messy and time-consuming. An app that let’s you register in a few clicks and helps the organizer to manage the registration process efficiently is very valuable.

2. Create a Personalized agenda

Most conferences offer a full programme. Give your attendees the ability to choose the sessions they are interested in and establish their personal conference agenda. The organizer receives valuable information about which session are going to be popular.

3. Exchange contact details through Badge Scanning

Networking is often at least one of the objectives of a conference or event. Now, what happens with all the collected business cards when you return to the office? A scanning function or another badging feature is useful to exchange networking information super efficiently.

4. Ability to Work offline

Ever been to a conference or event with poor WiFi access? Fill this one in for yourself …

5. Attendee networking & messaging

A good event app should help your visitors to detect other interesting people in the venue and to get in contact with them. It would even get better when it helps your attendees to stay in contact after the event.

6. Audience response system to increase interactivity

An app function that facilitates audience participation during the sessions adds value to your conference. Therefore it should enable attendees to send questions and comments to the stage.

7. Intuitive Design

Chances are big that stakeholders will user your app for the first time. So the learning curve should be smooth and easy. Good design makes an app not only more friendly to the eye but also more fun and easy to use.

Our nomination for the best event app of 2013

Mobiel Event App Double Dutch MSUK branding 180x300 How can I select the best app of 2013 for my event? by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)If we apply our list of essential functionalities to page 23 of the Event App Bible, only a few apps survive: Connectspan, DoubleDutch, NoodleLive and Spotme. If we then take a look at interface design, Double Dutch comes out as most promising to us. The app possesses all necessary functions which add extra value to an event. The modern interface is user-friendly and stimulates social interaction.

This week you get a chance to ‘test drive’ the app at the Meetings Show UK in London. Choose your operating system and download the #MSUK event app right here.

What do you think?

Which features should a good event app have in your opinion? Do you have experience with event apps? Which one would you recommend?

Please share your experiences with us!

A walk around the world – my highlights of #IMEX13 in Frankfurt

My mind is still busy processing all the impressions of last week since I went for a walk around the world within three days. IMEX 2013 in Frankfurt was my first international trade show and I had the lucky opportunity to jointhe  @IMEXSocialTeam. Equipped with tablet and smartphone we explored the show floor through the eyes of a visitor and captured funny and interesting stories between the various booth. Here are my personal highlights.05 Walk around the world Report IMEX Frankfurt HCIBS A walk around the world   my highlights of #IMEX13 in Frankfurt by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

 Creative in Malaysia

The beautiful décor of the Malaysia booth attracted my attention immediately:  big replica of the Petronas KLCC Twin Towers, Asian calligraphy and the delicious smell of fresh herbal tea. Besides the booth offered creative and relaxing activities. We were invited to make bracelets and necklaces from small beads, to colour pictures with batik dye or to barter with play money for small treasures. It was a great demonstration of low budget activities that spice up your booth.

05 IMEX 1 A walk around the world   my highlights of #IMEX13 in Frankfurt by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

 Crazy in Scandinavia

I was always convinced that long periods without natural light couldn’t be healthy for your mind. Now the exhibitors from Norway and Finland have proven me right. Nevertheless, with their crazy ideas they spread joy and fun all over the show floor. Norway opened the happy hour with a screaming contest, offering a trip to the North for the loudest voice. For sporty activities Finland was the place to be: the Fins arranged a real-life Angry Birds tournament.

Party in Holland

If you saw the orange booth of Holland you will understand why ‘gezelligheid’ is a Dutch word. No matter which time of the day you came along – it was always crowded with people who were laughing and cheering. After quitting time I was glad to enjoy a cold beer and have a good chat with the Dutch mascot Mr. Holland. Cheers!

DSC 0335 A walk around the world   my highlights of #IMEX13 in Frankfurt by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

Your highlight?

I had three fantastic days and hope that I will see Frankfurt again next year. How about you? What was your favourite booth, your best story or your greatest shot at IMEX in Frankfurt? We want to know! Please share them with us.

Spread the word: how can Social Media increase the reach of my event?

Many event planners search for new ideas to reach more attendees. Social Media can help you to extend your reach beyond the boundaries of the physical event, meeting, trade show or conference. In this post I would like to share some tactics to make this work for you.

Create an experience ‘worth sharing’

The easiest way to achieve massive exposure is to let your participants promote your event. But how? Thanks to the rise of Social Media and mobile phones, we now all have the option to share special experiences instantly with our colleagues, friends and family. If you manage to create such a remarkable experience at your event, you can get the word out to the social network of each participant, which on average contains 300-400 people.

pope2013 Spread the word: how can Social Media increase the reach of my event? by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

Go for visuals

Which updates make good shareable content for Social Media? In times where everyone starts to suffer from ‘information overload’, we only quickly scan our news feeds for interesting stuff. How can you win the battle for follower’s attention? Simple: funny, eye-catching pictures. We capture images faster than text, thus if you want to be seen, you should put your energy in clever visuals.

Find your ‘Mickey Mouse’

Mickey Mouse Spread the word: how can Social Media increase the reach of my event? by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)So how can you create a situation where an attendee grabs his cell phone to take a picture and share it with his friends? Learn from others. When you go to Disneyland, what would be your personal highlight? Right, you want to be on a photo with Mickey Mouse. The Disneyland mascot is so popular and well-known, that the picture itself has more marketing power than any written information. But you don’t necessarily need a popular mascot for the photo moment. The most important aspect is that you create a special situation, that is unique for your meeting or event and which places your attendee in the spotlights.

Leave the sharing to them

Of course you could place photoboxes, green screens or other fancy stuff for cool pictures. However, the great disadvantage of such tools is that you somehow have to manage how your attendee will receive and share the picture. Most shares occur instantly and are quickly forgotten after the ‘magic moment’  has passed. Thus, activate and facilitate the use of own cell phones and cameras, so that your attendee can share his picture immediately. Extra advantage: you don’t have to figure on which social platform (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc) you have to place the photos to maximize the reach. They will take care of that themselves, by automatically sharing the picture on the network where most of their audience is!

Sharing with attendees cameras Spread the word: how can Social Media increase the reach of my event? by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)And now what?

We hope you like our approach as described above. Interested in being able to do this yourself? Take a look at our Training Social Media for the Events Industry (in Dutch only)!

Social Media for events: interview with Eventplanner.TV

Check out this highly engaging episode of Eventplanner.TV about Social Media for events. Watch untill the end, where Gerrit shares Donald’s concept of “Some to Some” communication for the first time.

Description:

Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn, … Everybody is talking about it, but how many event organizers actually succeed in using social media? How many of them make money with it? Gerrit Heijkoop knows all the secrets of using social media successfully for your event.

Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen! – Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013

Je kan er niet meer omheen: de zorg over natuur en milieu blijft groeien en duurzaamheid is een van de belangrijkste aandachtspunten van onze maatschappij. Dit geldt ook voor de evenementenbranche. Steeds meer event planners, leveranciers en venues begrijpen dat ze de impact van events op het milieu terug moeten dringen. Maar de grote vraag blijft: hoe? Wat houdt ons nog tegen?

Op maandag 8 april organiseerde het Nederlandse Chapter van de Green Meetings Industry Council (GMIC) de 2e editie van de Sustainable Meetings Conference om deze kwestie te bespreken. Rond 30 deelnemers uit de branche verzamelden in het Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam City Centre aan het IJ voor presentaties, discussies en brainstorm-sessies over groene evenementen. Hier zijn de belangrijkste uitkomsten.

opening gmic2 Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen!   Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013 by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)Brainstorm: gebundelde kennis

Tijdens een korte brainstorm werden de deelnemers gevraagd om ideeën voor duurzamere evenementen te verzamelen. Het resultaat: een lijst van 76 (!) maatregelen direct uit het publiek. Blijkbaar is er dus geen gebrek aan inzicht omtrent duurzaamheid als we spontaan tientallen ideeën uit de mouw kunnen schudden. Waarom worden deze ideeën dan nog zo weinig toegepast in de praktijk? Wat houdt ons nog tegen?

uitdagingen gmic Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen!   Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013 by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

Uitdagingen en risico’s: het wiel opnieuw uitvinden

Tijdens een vervolgoverleg werden alle uitdagingen een risico’s omtrent de gevonden maatregelen in kaart gebracht. Het budget bleek de grootste uitdaging te zijn. De beste maatregelen hebben immers weinig nut als ze financiëel niet draagbaar zijn. Veel deelnemers vonden het ook lastig om geschikte leveranciers en personeel te vinden die de groene doelen willen steunen.

Het grootste probleem bleek echter nog ergens anders te zitten. Een deelnemer spraak het letterlijk uit:

“Wat ik nog mis is gewoon een concreet beleid, een plan van aanpak. Waarom zou ik het wiel opnieuw moeten uitvinden als er al mensen zijn die duurzaamheid succesvol in hun evenementen geïntegreerd hebben?”

welcome to the future3 Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen!   Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013 by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

Problemen zijn er om opgelost te worden

Een van deze mensen die het wiel al hebben uitgevonden was keynote speaker Duncan Stutterheim, medeoprichter en eigenaar van ID&T. Zijn bedrijf organiseert wereldwijd Dance events en staat in Nederland ondermeer bekend voor de festivals Sensation, Thunderdome en Mysteryland. Daarnaast is ID&T ook koploper op het gebied van duurzame events. Iedereen zit met gespitste oren te luisteren om wat ideeën op te pikken uit het duurzaamheidsbeleid van Duncan. Toch wordt er al gauw duidelijk dat er bij ID&T niet echt sprake kan zijn van een concreet beleid *(zie opmerking redacteur onderaan dit artikel). Wel van durf, creativiteit en een sterke hands-on mentaliteit.

De strategie van ID&T is redelijk simpel: kijk om je heen, herken problemen en bedenk hoe het beter kan. Zo hebben ze verschillende mogelijkheden bedacht om het grote afvalprobleem van festivals te beperken. Het publiek wordt gemotiveerd om papier, plastic en overig afval te scheiden met drie verschillende containers voor afval. Door een borg op de drankbekers worden deze vaker teruggebracht naar de bar en niet op de grond gegooid. Als je tien bekers bij de bar inlevert, krijg je zelfs een gratis biertje. Dit soort eenvoudige maatregelen kunnen al tot 40 procent minder zwerfafval leiden. Het zijn kleine stappen die je evenement stuk voor stuk duurzamer maken. Elke stap is dan ook weer een sprong in de diepte, een experiment en niemand kan van te voren al voorspellen of het een succes gaat worden. Duurzaam worden gaat niet overnacht – het is een continu proces van bedenken, proberen en verbeteren.

samen gmic Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen!   Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013 by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

Je bent niet alleen

Wie zegt dat je het allemaal alleen moet uitzoeken? Juist op het gebied van duurzaamheid kunnen we veel van elkaar leren en samen aan oplossingen werken. Volgens Duncan hoeft het helemaal niet moeilijk te zijn om vrijwilligers op een speelse manier bij je plannen te betrekken. Door een gratis festivalkaartje aan te bieden lokte hij voldoende vrijwilligers naar zijn festivalterreinen om het gebied weer grondig op te ruimen en op te knappen. Deze actie is inmiddels zo populair dat de vrijwilligers het ook nog zonder het kaartje willen doen. Sterker nog: ze komen ook zelf met ideeën om het event nog duurzamer te maken. Geheime tip dus: luister naar je bezoekers en naar je personeel. Zij zien vaak dingen die jij niet in de gaten hebt en kunnen jou inspireren met nuttige ideeën.

Mindswitch naar duurzaam

Wat houdt ons dus nog tegen om alleen nog maar groene events te plannen? De grootste uitdaging op het gebied van duurzame evenementen is onze mentale instelling. Er bestaat (nog) geen slimme handleiding die ons stapsgewijs naar groenere events leidt. Er zal geen groene Jezus komen die ons bij de hand neemt en naar een groene toekomst zal leiden. Die hebben we ook helemaal niet nodig. Op het gebied van kennis en inspiratie kunnen we het zeker net zo goed doen als een Duncan Stutterheim.

Dus, steek de handen uit de mouwen, pik een van de 76 maatregelen die je het meest aanspreekt en doe er iets me. Het is jou evenement, en als jij wil dat het duurzaam wordt mag je gerust al je energie en passie daaraan wijden.

 Reports (NL): Niet denken, doen!   Lessen uit de GMIC Conference 2013 by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

sfdsff

Meten is weten

Een van de belangrijkste tips die tijdens de sessie naar voren komen: maak het meetbaar. Of  je nou van plan bent om afval te voorkomen, energie te besparen of duurzamer voedsel aan te bieden -  het succes van de door jou genomen maatregelen laat zich alleen bepalen wanneer het meetbaar is. Op basis van de metingen kan je je vooruitgang over de jaren precies bepalen en doelen stellen voor de toekomst.

Het resumé voor deze GMIC Conference: de evenementenbranche heeft genoeg voorlichting over green meetings gehad. De volgende stap voor het GMIC is het nu hun te prikkelen, te inspireren, uitdagingen aantrekkelijk te maken en risico’s te relativeren.

*Opmerking van de redacteur: Met deze opmerking bedoelen we niet dat ID&T geen beleid heeft. De normen en waarden van hun bedrijfscultuur staan mooi en helder omschreven in hun brochure ‘Celebrate Life – A Story of our Company Soul’. Wat we wel bedoelen is dat ID&T gewoon problemen aanpakt en dingen uitprobeert in plaats van eerst uitgebreid onderzoek te doen, statistieken te analyseren en eindeloos te overleggen – geheel in het kader van ‘Niet lullen maar poetsen!’. 

How Can I Be Social – A Social Media Checklist for your next conference or event at #EMEC13, Montreux

Gerrit Heijkoop and Donald Roos will take you on a journey that will grow your confidence in how to approach new social technologies when organizing your next meeting or event.

View in external player (Silverlight): http://bit.ly/HCIBSEmec13

07 How Can I Be Social   A Social Media Checklist for your next conference or event at #EMEC13, Montreux by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

You can see and download the slides of this session right here:

3 Smart Social Media Lessons – from our own experience at IMEX

Three learnings from the @IMEXSocialTeam reporting from #IMEX12 in Frankfurt

During the IMEX in Frankfurt show in May, the “IMEX Social Team” reported live from the show floor. Our objective was to provide a participant’s perspective in real-time to the rest of the world and to help people with all their questions about social media so they could join the conversation online. In this post we share some of our key learnings for the use of Social Media at live events.

1. Make a connection between online and offline

From a cynical perspective, one could choose to view Twitter as a place where ‘people have a conversation with themselves, hoping that someone will respond’.  A more optimistic perspective sees the platform as a great opportunity to make potentially valuable new connections.  In practice during IMEX this meant the social team scanned the #IMEX12 timeline in order to identify people who were tweeting from the show floor and then we went to look them up and make a personal connection!

“Excuse me Melissa, you have been Tweeting at us, right?!” After a first look of surprise, we were always greeted with a big smile. “Yes indeed! How nice to meet you in real life!”.  Of course this usually led to a ‘photo opportunity’, which then resulted in a tweet, and often a re-tweet quickly thereafter.

Imex Social team Frankfurt 2012 meets Melissa in real life  3 Smart Social Media Lessons   from our own experience at IMEX by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)We believe it is vital to make a connection between the online and offline worlds at live events. Whether with a personal ‘lookup’ like we did, with a Tweetup Drink like the #EUventprofs community did, or with a physical ‘Tweetingpoint’, often supplied by the organiser. It is often the perfect – and the only – way to make online networking relevant to the offline networking goals and ambitions of a live event.

2. Add a personal touch

We were quite amazed that no less than 40% of our messages were ‘re-tweeted’. This gave us a much larger reach, compared to the 137 followers we collected in the five days we were active. We really made an effort to add a photo and someone’s @username to almost every message which gave a strong incentive to the re-tweeter. This tactic alone, although requiring a bit more work and attention to detail, seemed to be almost a guaranteed recipe for a ‘re-tweet’. Why? Because people love to be in the spotlight!

Imex Social Team Frankfurt 2012 with Ray Bloom  3 Smart Social Media Lessons   from our own experience at IMEX by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)And they want to tell their friends about it. Have you ever been mentioned in a newspaper when you were a kid? I bet you saved that clipping and showed it to your parents, grandparents, neighbours and classmates didn’t you? For now that principle still seems to hold in the Social Media arena. Our tip: next time you write up a Social Media message, try to add a personal touch to it and see what difference it makes.

3. Integrate with other media

Twitter and live events are made for each other. Due to the fact that all updates are public, it makes it really easy to connect with people at the same event, whether you’ve met them before or not. However, Twitter has a drawback: it still only reaches a minority of your total audience. That is why we strongly believe in integration with other media such as print and e-mail, which are accessible to everyone.

Adding a selection of ‘user generated content’ to your existing editorial media is a reward for the crowd that is already tweeting about your event (see previous learning). And at the same time it will show those who are not yet participating in the online conversation that there is some good stuff going on.  And of course, the more people tweeting about your event, the more exposure and reach you (and your sponsors!) can enjoy.

Imex Social Team Frankfurt 2012  3 Smart Social Media Lessons   from our own experience at IMEX by How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)You’ll be able to see the @IMEXSocialTeam in action again at IMEX America in Las Vegas from October 9th – 11th where we’ll be sponsored by MEXICO.  Don’t forget to send a tweet to @IMEXSocialTeam once you get there. We’ll do our best to find you on the show floor!

HCIBS on air: the adoption of Social Media for events and conferences

In May 2012 Gerrit Heijkoop visited IMEX Frankfurt as part of the IMEX Social Team. In this conversation with Ruud Janssen he explains how Social Media are becoming an integral part of events and conferences and why you should start on Twitter now.

Your questions and comments are welcome!

Watch full length video at: http://vimeo.com/42823708

TRANSSCRIPT:
Ruud Janssen: What level of patience do meeting and event organizers need to have when they strategize that this is an important component of their communication? How much time should they give it in the user adoption of their group, for it to actually come to a purposeful business investment, backslash that the community starts getting built? How much time does that take, do you think?

Gerrit Heijkoop: I would say as a rule of thumb at least three rounds of your event or cycle. If you have an annual event, that’s three years. If you have a biannual, that’s six years, but you could do little stuff in between to improve that. If you have a monthly event it could be three months. It starts with what I call top management commitment, so as an organizer and as the executive level of an organizing committee or association, really standing behind this and adapting this and saying we are going to do this, we believe in this and we’ll lead the way.

Even while it’s only 5, or 10, or 15% of our audience participating. That could be like 10 tweets. You feel like, “Oh my God, is this paying off ever?” Now if you come to the second cycle, you obviously have the first 10 or 15 people who did it last time, and you have built up some evidence.

You have hopefully collected some cases, some nice stories about what happened last time. For example, for me personally, I was traveling here by train, I was tweeting in the train, obviously, to Roel Frissen, who was going by plane. We had a thing like, “Let’s race, who’s here earlier? Plane or train?”

Janssen: It’s like a Top Gear show or something, right?

Heijkoop: Exactly. It was like that. Then, two ladies who were in the train as well picked up, because they were both following us. We were like, “Oh you’re in the train as well. Let’s do a tweetup.” So we had this spontaneous tweet up in the train, in the bistro, I had a nice cup of coffee, and that worked out really well. I can’t tell you the end of the story yet, and I can’t tell you, well, I made so much business out of that, but these are the little seeds that make it grow. To go back to the cycle for the event organizer, so next event, you start celebrating the stuff that happened at the first event and that will make more people will catch on.

You need to grow that critical mass, and let’s be honest at this time the social media add ups are still a minority. It’s anywhere between 10 and 40% of your audience. That’s a minority

Janssen: But is the minority the movers and shakers, and those that are the innovators? Or is it the minority that’s just addicted to gadgets, technology and trying anything that’s new?

Heijkoop: Well, if you look at that curve, and obviously we all know the adoption curve is an S curve. Let’s say it took about five years to get to this either 10 or 30%. It’s not going to take another five years to gain the next 30. We all feel it.

Janssen: So now is the time.

Heijkoop: Now is the time to jump in.

Janssen: It’s not too late?

Heijkoop: It’s not too late at all, but within one or two years you will be at 60%. Then all of a sudden, if you’re not joining the conversation online, you are becoming the minority. You are missing out on stuff.

Janssen: You will be overwhelmed potentially,

END OF TRANSSCRIPT

Thank you for watching: Sharing is caring!
Let us know what you think via Twitter
http://twitter.com/ruudwjanssen – Ruud Janssen
http://twitter.com/gheijkoop – Gerrit Heijkoop

http://twitter.com/HCIBS – How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

or join the conversation on Facebook: http://facebook.com/hcibs

Want to see more?

more videos from the interview with Ruud Janssen at IMEX Frankfurt?
or
more videos about the use of Social Media at conferences & events?

check http://www.HCIBS.TV

video credits:

production
ABBIT Meeting Support – http://www.abbit.eu

sponsors of video booth
LONDON & Partners
Meetings Review International
Meeting Support Institute

soundtrack
“River Flow” by unknown artist

[NL] Social media op evenementen: interview met Eventbranche.nl op Event12

“Het integreren van social media op evenementen. Eindelijk praktische toepasssingen! Een gesprek met Gerrit Heijkoop van de Social Media Helpdesk.”

Productie credits: Media Centrum Hilversum

HCIBS on air: opportunities and obstacles of hybrid events

In May 2012 Gerrit Heijkoop visited IMEX in Frankfurt as part of the IMEX Social Team. Ruud Janssen interviewed him about inspiring conferences and the evolution of hybrid events.

Your questions and comments are welcome!

Watch full length video at: http://vimeo.com/42823708

TRANSSCRIPT:
Ruud Janssen: What level of patience do meeting and event organizers need to have when they strategize that this is an important component of their communication? How much time should they give it in the user adoption of their group, for it to actually come to a purposeful business investment, backslash that the community starts getting built? How much time does that take, do you think?

Gerrit Heijkoop: I would say as a rule of thumb at least three rounds of your event or cycle. If you have an annual event, that’s three years. If you have a biannual, that’s six years, but you could do little stuff in between to improve that. If you have a monthly event it could be three months. It starts with what I call top management commitment, so as an organizer and as the executive level of an organizing committee or association, really standing behind this and adapting this and saying we are going to do this, we believe in this and we’ll lead the way.

Even while it’s only 5, or 10, or 15% of our audience participating. That could be like 10 tweets. You feel like, “Oh my God, is this paying off ever?” Now if you come to the second cycle, you obviously have the first 10 or 15 people who did it last time, and you have built up some evidence.

You have hopefully collected some cases, some nice stories about what happened last time. For example, for me personally, I was traveling here by train, I was tweeting in the train, obviously, to Roel Frissen, who was going by plane. We had a thing like, “Let’s race, who’s here earlier? Plane or train?”

Janssen: It’s like a Top Gear show or something, right?

Heijkoop: Exactly. It was like that. Then, two ladies who were in the train as well picked up, because they were both following us. We were like, “Oh you’re in the train as well. Let’s do a tweetup.” So we had this spontaneous tweet up in the train, in the bistro, I had a nice cup of coffee, and that worked out really well. I can’t tell you the end of the story yet, and I can’t tell you, well, I made so much business out of that, but these are the little seeds that make it grow. To go back to the cycle for the event organizer, so next event, you start celebrating the stuff that happened at the first event and that will make more people will catch on.

You need to grow that critical mass, and let’s be honest at this time the social media add ups are still a minority. It’s anywhere between 10 and 40% of your audience. That’s a minority

Janssen: But is the minority the movers and shakers, and those that are the innovators? Or is it the minority that’s just addicted to gadgets, technology and trying anything that’s new?

Heijkoop: Well, if you look at that curve, and obviously we all know the adoption curve is an S curve. Let’s say it took about five years to get to this either 10 or 30%. It’s not going to take another five years to gain the next 30. We all feel it.

Janssen: So now is the time.

Heijkoop: Now is the time to jump in.

Janssen: It’s not too late?

Heijkoop: It’s not too late at all, but within one or two years you will be at 60%. Then all of a sudden, if you’re not joining the conversation online, you are becoming the minority. You are missing out on stuff.

Janssen: You will be overwhelmed potentially,

END OF TRANSSCRIPT

Thank you for watching: Sharing is caring!
Let us know what you think via Twitter
http://twitter.com/ruudwjanssen – Ruud Janssen
http://twitter.com/gheijkoop – Gerrit Heijkoop

http://twitter.com/HCIBS – How Can I Be Social (HCIBS)

or join the conversation on Facebook: http://facebook.com/hcibs

Want to see more?

more videos from the interview with Ruud Janssen at IMEX Frankfurt?
or
more videos about the use of Social Media at conferences & events?

check http://www.HCIBS.TV

video credits:

production
ABBIT Meeting Support – http://www.abbit.eu

sponsors of video booth
LONDON & Partners
Meetings Review International
Meeting Support Institute

soundtrack
“River Flow” by unknown artist